Tuesday, September 23, 2008

Training and Event Updates for September 23 2008

Back from the trip out west. Some of the insights from the trip will undoubtedly make their way into the blog and into some of the classes. So keep your feed channel tuned to this station (or sign up for automatic email updates on the side bar).

Meanwhile, here are this week's updates for performance programs in the Ohio Valley area.

Interpersonal Communications, Leadership and Public Speaking

Dale Carnegie Course: Effective Communication and Human Relations

Strictly Business: The Dale Carnegie Immersion Seminar

Sales and Sales Communication

The Sales Advantage

Make Sales: How to Jump Start Your Selling Career

Leadership and Management

Leadership Training for Managers

The Leadership Advantage

Group Communication, Public Speaking, Presentation and Platform Skills

High Impact Presentations

Supplemental Events

The Marshall Goldsmith Seminar: What Got You Here Won't Get You There..

McGohan Brabender: Negotiation - From Conflict to Collaboration

McGohan Brabender: Negotiation - From Conflict to Collaboration

McGohan Brabender: Negotiation - From Conflict to Collaboration

Dale Carnegie Seminar: How to Keep Your Staff Engaged, Energized & Motivated.

Dale Carnegie Seminar: How to Cold Call to Build New Customers.

Thursday, September 18, 2008

Drill, Baby, Drill

Wind power as an alternate to using oil. Just another hallmark of the creative thinking process that is turning a dry brown desert into a green environment.Here is another quick observation before I hit the road again.

While watching the RNC, I noticed that the phrase “Drill, Baby, Drill” had become the mantra of the convention and now it is the Republican Party’s slogan.

I also noticed that both candidates, McCain and Obama now support offshore drilling and talk about reducing our dependency on foreign oil.

They also mention alternative sources for energy like wind, solar and nuclear all in the same, rushed sentence.

I've always wondered, what would happen if they took the word "foreign" out of their rhetoric?

Instead, what if our candidates talked about reducing our dependency on... oil?

Even in politics, real change is dependent on the types of questions we ask our team members and ourselves because the questions we ask determine the answers that we find.

For instance, while driving down the south side of Joshua Tree National Park, along I-10 in California, I came across a windmill farm.

Only this wasn't the typical windmill farm with 20 to 30 windmills.

No, while our presidential candidates have only recently been talking about the need to explore wind as a source of energy, someone a while back had decided to take matters into their own hands and explore an opportunity.

They created what appears to be the largest windmill orchard in the world.

A small section of the windmill farm just outside Palm Springs in the Californian desert.
There are rows of these windmills, stretched as far as the eye can see, busily converting the high winds of the area into usable electricity.

Somehow, I don't think the team that created this energy orchard, sat around and said, "Hmm, I wonder how we can reduce our dependency on foreign oil?"

The team probably started off with a question like, "What if we could generate a substantial amount of electricity from the high winds that blow through this area?"

These types of question are classified as a possibility question and are useful for looking forward into creating possible futures.

But these guys didn't stop there.

After that, they probably asked, "How can we create a device for converting wind into electrical energy? What would such a device look like? In what way can we use the materials that we have to create a device powered by the wind and will supply 25% to 30% of our current electrical needs?"

These kinds of questions are process questions. They focus on processes and activities and are very useful for getting things done.

If I had to guess, I'd say that the team that created this windmill farm probably called Ed Eppley out to conduct one of his famous green-light brainstorming sessions before beginning that project.

A great scientist named Einstein once said, "The significant problems we have cannot be solved at the same level of thinking with which we created them."

We currently face some of the biggest challenges of this century, not just as a nation, but in our corporations as well as on a personal level. We won't solve them using the same thinking strategies that got us to where we are today. In order to address the new challenges, we need to employ new thinking strategies, ask some different questions and do something totally different.

Because, again, to paraphrase Einstein, “Insanity is defined as doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results”

It’s time for something new in your business and your life. Get started by asking some new and different questions.

Monday, September 15, 2008

Training Events and Updates for September 16 2008

Follow the adventure on Twitter.

Traveling East along I-10 in CA through the land of the Joshua Trees. A few days here will give me an opportunity to finish Marshall Goldsmith's book, "What Got You Here Won't Get You There". The habits are straightforward and easy to understand. As usual, it's not the knowledge that the challenge, it's acting on that knowledge.

Based on what I've read so far, would highly recommend the book for anyone who has attained a certain level of technical prowess in their job but are finding that the biggest hindrance in career advancement is in their behavioral habits. Amazingly, the habits that have helped us succeed so far are probably the ones that are now preventing us from advancing.

Of course if you are more interested in making something happen, take the 2 day program performed by Ed Eppley.

Here are this week's updates for performance programs in the Ohio Valley area.

Interpersonal Communications, Leadership and Public Speaking

Dale Carnegie Course: Effective Communication and Human Relations

Strictly Business: The Dale Carnegie Immersion Seminar

Sales and Sales Communication

The Sales Advantage

Make Sales: How to Jump Start Your Selling Career

Leadership and Management

Leadership Training for Managers

The Leadership Advantage

Group Communication, Public Speaking, Presentation and Platform Skills

High Impact Presentations

Supplemental Events

The Marshall Goldsmith Seminar: What Got You Here Won't Get You There..

McGohan Brabender: Negotiation - From Conflict to Collaboration

McGohan Brabender: Planning and Execution

Dale Carnegie Seminar: How to Keep Your Staff Engaged, Energized & Motivated.

Dale Carnegie Seminar: How to Cold Call to Build New Customers.



Speed Your Way to Success

OK. Here is another quick observation.

While travelling west on I80 coming out of Donner Pass, I got ensnared in trap, a speed trap.

Well, maybe ensnared is not quite the right word.

I-80 coming through the Pass from NV into CA is really twisty and steep. My trunk was full of stuff, which made the rear of the car a little heavier than usual. So coming down that pass and making those turns, well, I had to slow down a lot in order to keep my car from fishtailing.

So while I’m trying to keep the rear of my car from swinging back and forth wildly, I watched a whole bunch of other cars zip right by me taking the turns like Dale Earnhardt Jr.

Just as I get to the bottom and rounded the last turn, I spotted one of California’s finest lecturing one of the motorists that had passed me up (ok, actually, the CHP was writing out a citation).

As I drove a little further, I noticed a few more patrol cars had paired off with other motorists who had zipped by me.

And that was when I noticed them.

An army of CHP cars, all lined up along the side of the road like jets on a runway waiting for their turn to take off.

If I had to venture a guess as to how many were there, I’d have to say all of them.

These guys were organized, they had their act together, and they were writing out citations faster than Michael Phelps handing out autographs after his historic swim at the Beijing Olympics.

This thing was extremely well organized and executed.

Very much like the speed trap I saw in MO when I picked up I-40 just outside St. Louis.

Same strategy as used by the CHP. Missouri's finest lined up on the side of the road, taking turns snagging the motorists who did not notice the one lone peace officer with the radar gun targeting everyone coming up on I-40 and radioing the intel to his buddies.

So what am I saying here, that success is tied to observing and obeying the traffic laws?

Well, you certainly won't make any money if you are wasting it on your lead feet.

But consider this. In both cases, these patrol officers were organized. By working together and getting the right people on the team, they caught a lot more zippy motorist than if each one had worked alone or if they just quickly threw a bunch of the office staff together.

The speed trap would have been ineffective had some patrol cars been pointing south while others were pointing north. It would not have been effective if the “meter maids” in those little golf carts were a part of the team chasing down motorist blasting down the road at 75MPH.

No, someone had decided what the objectives were, the best place to hold this “event”, who should be a part of this event and what part everyone would play in order to achieve maximum effectiveness.

You need to do the same thing in arranging your resources to attain maximum effectiveness in achieving your goals and objectives.

Like the speed trap, you have many resources that are available to you. You have people that you can leverage and make part of your mastermind team. You have hard resources like money and time. And you have personal resources like skills, talents, knowledge and past experiences.

Too often we think of resources as things like money, tangible assets and time. These are things that we can measure, see and touch.

Rarely do we ever consider our skills, talents and especially our experiences as assets. After all, there is no effective way to measure them.

And rarely do we effectively leverage our human capital. Instead of collaborate with people and looking for mutual benefit for both parties, we often look for ways to “get something from them” or “how to effectively ‘utilize’ them”.

But just because we can’t measure these resources doesn’t negate their existence or their effect on our inner processes and the outer world.

And if we don’t partner with our mastermind team, we run the risk of alienating the very people who can help us in our quest.

Because we rarely organize these non-tangible resources, the ones that stand to make the biggest impact, are left scattered, ill used and probably doing more to hinder us in achieving our outcome.

In order to maximize your personal effectiveness, you need to first know what you are trying to achieve. Then you need to know what your resources are, which ones to actually use in your endeavor, and how to organize these resources to insure that you move towards achieving your outcome.

If you can identify and organize your resources, you will get a lot further on the road to reaching your goal than if you just threw everything together and let the chips fall where they may.

Bottom line, if you want to catch more of the opportunities that are zipping by you, learn to identify and organize all of your resources that can help you achieve your outcomes. Once you have them organized for maximum effectiveness, achieving your outcomes will be quick and easy.

Wednesday, September 10, 2008

Secret Element for Success

Devils Tower in WyomingWhile traveling through WY, I stopped at the first US National Monument, the Devil’s Tower.

Some of you may remember this artifact from Steven Spielberg’s Close Encounters of the Third Kind with Richard Dreyfuss.

There are a number of trails in the area, one of them encircling the base of the Tower.

While hiking around this trail, I came across several climbers scaling the side of the Tower.

As I looked up, an old worn phrase came to mind: “It’s lonely at the top.”

In the past, I’ve always taken this to mean that to get to the top, you had to sacrifice your relationships, be ruthless and step on the bodies left in the wake of your quest to be successful.

In short no lasting friendships. Only shallow relationships and business acquaintances.

After looking at these climbers as they scaled to the top, I had a different view of this phrase, effectively reframing it to mean something new.

These climbers weren’t mavericks or cowboys. They didn’t try to do it on their own, go it alone, or step on each other on the way up.

They helped one another.

At any given time, the person doing the climbing had someone at the bottom giving encouragement and feeding the line, and someone at the top, giving encouragement and holding the line, both giving support in every sense of the word.

The climb to the top requires a personal vision and commitment, something that only you can provide.But the climber ultimately had to make the climb themselves. No one was going to pull them up, no one was going to get under the climber and push them up. Their team could provide assistance, support and encouragement, but ultimately, the individual had to make their own effort.

I doubt that any of them said, “Well, I really would like to get to the top, but I’m kind of tired and out of shape. Why don’t you guys pull me up?” And I seriously doubt that any one of them got halfway up and said, “OK. I’m kind of tired now. I have had enough. I want to go home now.”

Reaching the top and being successful has less to do with stepping on bodies and destroying relationships and more with a personal vision and a strong commitment to reaching your goal. Those climbers were getting to the top because they wanted it. They owned it.

Yet, on any given night, you can find at least 10 infomercials on TV that expound on systems for getting rich or losing weight. Just follow these steps, do what everyone else has done and you can be richer than Trump with a body like Schwarzenegger.

Sounds simple enough. And that is why many people will buy these programs. They are looking for a quick fix or a magic bullet to make success easy. They will go through the motions of the program with no passion or commitment. And when they fail to produce the desired results using the program, they shelve the DVDs, use the exercise equipment to hold clothes, and state that the system is nothing but a gimmick.

The reason it’s lonely at the top? It is lonely at the top because many people have not taken the time to decide what they want, create a vision for their life and devise a plan on how to get to that point.

If you really want to be successful, sit down one Saturday morning and write down all of the things that are really important in your life and create a vision for your life that encompasses those things.

Many people can make suggestions and offer their help. And some will even try to tell you what you should be doing with your life and what you need to do to be successful.

But the only person who can decide what you want for your life, is you. Might as well get started. Looks like it can be a long climb up to the top.

Wednesday, September 3, 2008

Twitter Is Not Just For The Birds

Follow Dale Carnegie Training on Twitter.

Have you ever been to a seminar and wished you could have gotten inside the presenter’s head before the seminar to understand how they came up with these groundbreaking ideas?

Ever wished you could have gotten a heads up on a particular event before the event was “formally announced”?

Have you ever wanted to be a “fly on the wall” of your mentor or personal coach just to see their thoughts and ideas without spending a bunch of time physically chasing them around?

Now you can! With Twitter, now you can follow our team without leaving the comfort of your own chair and discover some of their thoughts, insights and inspirations as they happen.

Simply visit our site http://www.dcarnegietraining.com/ and look at the About Us -> Trainers & Consultants menu. From there, you can click on any picture of our team members and gain access to their profile.

At the bottom of their profile, you will find a Twitter window into their latest thoughts or revelations. Click on the small link below the window and you can dive deeper and get more history.

Be a little patient. You won’t find our entire team on Twitter just yet. But over the next few months, our instructors and top sales consultants will find their footing on the new media. And as this occurs, you will discover that this provides you with an unprecedented advantage in connecting with your sales reps, your instructors and your personal coaches.

Happy twittering!